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Pirates, Pacts With the Devil and... ? Acadian Folk Traditions of Nova Scotia? - Acadiens de partout. [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
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Pirates, Pacts With the Devil and... ? Acadian Folk Traditions of Nova Scotia? [Dec. 10th, 2007|05:52 pm]
Acadiens de partout.

acadiens

[ladymisty]
Finish this title for me:

"Pirates, Pacts With the Devil and ... "

... and what??

In the Spring, I'm going to be teaching a couple of courses through the Valley Community Learning Association in Kentville, the association that I'm taking a Spanish course from now - and that me and Jandrae/Athala have taken an art course from in the past.

It looks like I will be doing 3 things:
- Giving a lecture on the Mystery of Jerome (2.5 hour lecture at the end of March)
- Teaching a course about Acadians (probably a 2.5 hr class once a week for 8 weeks)
- Teaching a course about Acadian Folklore (same but not as many weeks long).

It does depend on enough people signing up to take the course. There have to be at least 7 people in your course.

I'm working on the title and blurbs for each - that needs to be done a.s.a.p. so they can include them in their announcements/flyers and online course calendar etc.

For the general Acadian course, I'm thinking of Crash Course in Acadie or something like that because it will be a sort of overview of what is an Acadian? who are the Acadians of this area, how did they live, where and when and what happened to them? People who live in this region usually don't know much at all about Acadians, much less about the Acadians who lived here before the Deportation - the people who built the dykes. People here kinda have a general idea because of the Grand Pre park but most have never been to the park, they just drive by it or hear of it. So maybe 3/4 of the course would be about local Acadian history and then the rest about our culture (an overview of our music, food, language, customs, and so on - but with a focus on the Acadians of N.S.). If they want to go more in-depth about our culture, then that's the other course:

The other course is on Acadian Folklore. This would focus on Nova Scotia Acadians & would include storytelling but also extend to everything from our version of Mardi Gras (la Mi-Careme), to music, food (rappie pie!!), local parades and festivals, and even to the more recent Tintamarre and 'Grosses Tetes'. I can have a professional Acadian storyteller or two come in as invited guests (my mother duh) and I have a pretty big pool of ressources as far as all this goes.

Possible title: Acadian Folk Traditions of Nova Scotia What do you think...??

Lots of Nova Scotians have heard of folklorist Helen Creighton and many have her books Bluenose Magic and Bluenose Ghosts - lots of people have read books about Maritime ghost stories and legends, any bookstore's Atlantic Canada or local section has plenty of books on this subject.

But for Acadians, a minority, torn apart by the Deportation and living as pockets of people scattered in isolated communities, folklore was an extremely vital part of their very survival and continued existence. I mean, when you have a people whose language is an oral one, not even a written language, how can you expect its stories and traditions to be passed down? Folklore becomes SO much more important when you're talking about a people who doesn't have its own written language.

--I've been trying to think of a catchy title for something else but only have the 1st part. Maybe you can help. ?

Pirates, Pacts With the Devil, and.... ---- .

I want something else that starts with 'P' and would fit there, having to do with Acadian folklore/legends. I'm thinking of Jerome (thought to be involved with pirates), Cy a Mateur (sold his soul to the Devil) and then I don't know what else to complete the phrase.
Any ideas?! I can't write 'poutine', that's a Quebec thing, despite how many people think it has to do with Acadians. What's something in our legends or traditions that starts with 'P'?

??
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